Friday, January 20, 2017

Mobile Phone Safety for Parents by Family Orbit



Mobile Phone Safety for Parents is a complete guide that can help you get to know and understand ways in which your teenager and other children may potentially use or abuse their smartphone. This guide will not only explore the features and benefits of smartphones but also provide you with safety tips, which will allow you to monitor your child and help them to make the most of their device.

Here is a preview of what you will learn in this comprehensive guide:
  • Proven ways of assessing your child’s maturity to use a cell phone or not
  • Six essential actions you must take when you get your child his/her first cell phone
  • How to identify and manage bad phone behaviour
  • How to help your child use his/her device with responsibility
  • How to teach cell phone care to your young one and much more.
  • Recommended family safety apps to install on their cell phone.

You will be guilty of helping your children abuse their smartphone if you do not educate them properly. Mobile Phone Safety for Parents will show how to this with love.


Visit the site here to download your free copy.


Monday, January 16, 2017

Learn to Read the EASY WAY! by Peter Canonico




Learn to Read the EASY WAY!


Yes there is an EASY WAY and this is it. So EASY your child can teach himself. We give your child the sound the letter makes. Plus, we do it so fast your child will not be hampered by it. This product is great for kids and adults, too.


Learn to Read the EASY WAY!
Get our new book Learn to Read the EASY WAY!
Those old flash cards confust kids.Chcck out our page.
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Monday, January 9, 2017

I Promised Not to Tell: Raising a Transgender Child by Cheryl B. Evans




I Promised Not to Tell


A must read for a parent, relative or friend of a gender questioning or transgender person. I Promised Not to Tell is a deeply personal and emotional parenting memoir told by the mother of a transgender child. This book will benefit anyone who would like to learn more about transgenderism. Honest, moving and well written, you will not be disappointed!

"I Promised Not to Tell is quite possibly one of the most important books to date on a very controversial and little understood social issue: transgenderism. If you are facing such a situation with your child, I urge you to read this book. Both you and your child need what Cheryl has so kindly shared with readers and parents. And when you do, I’m sure you will come away impressed not just by the courage shown by Jordan in this book, but by the love Cheryl and her husband have for their children and their compassion for all people. I loved I Promised Not to Tell. Couldn't put it down. Highly recommended reading." ~ Viga Boland

Together, Mom and her husband raised their children telling them: "You can be anything and do anything you want in life." They just never expected that what their youngest daughter would desire most in the world, was to be a boy.

What is unique about this story is that it follows one transgender child from birth through age eighteen. You get a real sense of what this family went through. Their son's desperate effort to comply to societal gender norms, a suicide attempt, a family members struggle with God and transgerderism, a heart breaking death and much more. Every step of their son's transition from female to male (FTM) is discussed in detail, including hormone replacement therapy and sex reassignment surgeries. This book shares it all in the hopes of making a difference in what seems like a harsh and cruel world for transgender people.

In the beginning, transgender was not even on this mother's radar. There was so much to learn. She went from knowing nothing at all about the subject to becoming significantly more knowledgeable. She partook in a journey of learning that evolved into one of self discovery for her as much as for her transgender child. There were valuable lessons and gifted blessings along the way. There were also times of great heartache and pain. Mom was strengthened, she was tested, she wept and she prayed and in the end, she survived as did her transgender child.

The journey this family took is spelled out in the pages of this book in the hope that it offers encouragement, support and wisdom to others who may have found themselves on a similar path. Mom shares many of the resources she used along her own family’s journey and extends to you a friendship that goes far beyond the pages of this book.

This is a uniquely written and thought provoking true story which transitions beautifully between the family’s personal journey and some of the larger societal issues that face the transgender community today.

Even if you don't know a transgender person, this book will make you feel as if you do. Maybe you have been curious about this topic and looking for a book that can share honest and intimate details on the subject. If so, this book will certainly do that for you.

Coming out as a transgender person can be challenging. This book could be an excellent way to introduce the topic to parents and loved ones. Perhaps helping to pave the way to acceptance and understanding.

Thank you for taking the time to consider the book "I Promised Not to Tell ~ Raising a transgender child".



Buy links




About Cheryl B. Evans



I'd like to introduce myself and say hello to you. My name is Cheryl and I am married with two wonderful children, a daughter Mariah and a son Jordan. Jordan happens to be transgender (assigned female at birth). To offer you a little background, Jordan was presumed to be a tomboy for the early part of his life up until about puberty. My husband and I were ignorant to the fact transgender children even existed at the time so just accepted our daughter with all her boyish tendencies. However, around age 12 things took a turn we were not prepared for.

Jordan decided to try desperately to fit into society’s binary role of female, an experiment that didn't go well to say the least. After some challenging times, he finally told my husband and me he was transgender at age 12. Thankfully, today, he is a healthy, happy and well adjusted 18 year old. The road to today was not always an easy one and along our journey I realized just how hard some children have it. How so many families turn their own children away.

Along our journey we fought hurtful religious ignorance and my daughter struggled the most with accepting that her younger sister was becoming her brother. It may even interest you to know that my son and I, through perseverance and dedication got Ontario to change the law at the end of 2014 to allow minors to be able to change the gender marker on their birth certificate.

To help me deal with the changes that were happening in our family I wrote - a lot. I documented our entire journey of helping our daughter become our son. The doctors, the hormones, the surgeries and in the end I realized I'd written the book I wish I had when Jordan came out to me. In the end in my own effort to help other families to know they are not alone and to help the transgender community as a whole I decided (with my son's blessing) to publish our story. I changed all our names to help protect my son as his deepest wish is to only be known as a regular teenage boy. My book I Promised Not to Tell - Raising a transgender child was released on July 15, 2016. Here's a link to where you can learn more and read some testimonials: https://www.amazon.com/Promised-Not-Tell-Raisi…/…/0995180717

I sincerely hope it will help someone following this page and perhaps help to change society’s often harsh view of this community. Feel free to check it out or share this post with anyone you feel could be helped by it. It was written over almost three years and the result is our family's deeply personal and emotional journey to discovering the son we never knew we had. If you have any questions for me don't hesitate to ask. I can't promise to have all the answers but will opening share anything I think could make your own journey just a little bit easier.

With love, and blessing, Cheryl.

Find Cheryl online:




Saturday, January 7, 2017

Beyond Good Manners: How to Raise a Sophisticated Child by Tara Woods Turner, CEP & J. Blake Turner PhD



Beyond Good Manners


Unlock the key to creating a cultivated life for your child with this book targeted parenting guide. You will learn how to raise an engaging, accomplished and sophisticated child, one who gets noticed for all the right reasons. From fine dining, travel and art appreciation to navigating social media with integrity - Beyond Good Manners: How to Raise a Sophisticated Child will show you how to take your child to the next level of personal and social development. Whether your child is 5 or 15 this is the one book you will reference time and again for advice and techniques that are relevant, practical and insightful.”


http://amzn.to/2j3C9yn


About Tara Woods Turner


Tara Woods Turner is an etiquette consultant, author and online content contributor. She lives in New York City and believes strong societies are built upon strong families. She also spends way too much time analyzing James Taylor lyrics.

"Etiquette is one of my biggest passions" she says "I want people to unlock the power of civility and make common courtesy a part of their daily lives. Treating others with respect comes naturally when we realize how much better the world would be if we did."

In addition to reading, Tara enjoys cooking, entertaining, trying to find space for her American girl collection and spending time with her amazing family and friends.

"52 Weeks of Business Success" Profile
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/52-weeks-better-business-strategy-week-five-kenneth-bator?published=u

April Stephens Full Interview
http://www.momdoesreviews.com/tag/beyond-good-manners-how-to-raise-a-sophisticated-child/

Sunday, October 30, 2016

Potty Training: Stop the Mess...The Ultimate Potty Training Guide

Potty Training


Tired of changing those stinky diapers? This guide shows you some easy tips and helpful advice for potty training your child. Featuring information that's so easy even Dad can do it! Get the answers you seek right now with this in depth guide.


Get your copy today!

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Take Off! Your Pocket Coach to Student Success - An Interactive Journal by Emile Nelson and Asa Odback



Take Off!


Less than 35% of college students graduate in four years, and that figure is actually closer to 19% at most public universities. Even worse, more than 40% never graduate at all! It’s obvious that students need someone on their side, but not everyone can afford their own personal coach. So we developed Your Pocket Coach — the solution that anybody can afford! Instead of just telling you what to do, this interactive journal coaches you with stories, tips and simple steps, so you can… Learn More, faster! Boost Your Creativity! Build Better Relationships! Feel More Involved, Engaged and Confident! And Succeed in College! Everybody has the potential to be successful and live an awesome life! Your Pocket Coach will show you how.


http://amzn.to/2ctrj2n



Émile Nelson recently graduated from UC Santa Barbara as a member of Phi Beta Kappa with straight As, Highest Honors and a University Award of Distinction. He also served as the Editor in Chief of UCSB’s nationally-ranked newspaper, and delivered the graduation speech. Åsa Odbäck graduated #1 in her class from Law School, taught law at the University of Stockholm, graduated #1 in her class from Stockholm Business School, and started a success training company that worked with major companies like Volvo and Ericsson.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Touretters by Chris Mason & Members of the TS Community



Touretters


Tourette’s Syndrome is a hereditary condition that causes acute, uncontrollable muscle spasm (ticcing) and uncontrollable verbal outbursts in more than 250,000 people in North America. It is one of the least known, least understood, most undiagnosed and misdiagnosed conditions in North America today. It affects all races and ethnicities. There is no known cure, though therapies and some medications have been known to lessen its affects. Some conditions lessen as people age and some worsen.

Here for the first time is a collection of short stories written by members of the Tourette’s community –Touretters- People living with it and their family members who support them. This collection was the idea of Chris Mason, who collected the stories and who also has Tourette’s. Many of the authors have chosen to remain anonymous. Sensitivity to TS has lagged behind the perception of those with other debilitating conditions. The stories are touching, powerful, maddening, and filled with enough lessons to begin to enlighten us all about Tourette’s Syndrome.



http://amzn.to/2blZppU


Read an excerpt:

With The Blink Of An Eye

I came into this world by way of c-section, as an eight pound baby boy, after my mom had endured twenty difficult hours of labor. The doctor who delivered me left a scar on my temple, when he accidentally squeezed the forceps that he used to pry me from my mother’s womb, too tightly. It is a mark that has not gone away. Neither have the two disorders that have plagued me for most of my life.
I had never heard of Tourette Syndrome when I was diagnosed at age twenty. I started having symptoms of it at the age of six. For the fourteen years in between I wondered what was wrong with me and why I wasn’t like other people. When I was diagnosed I now I knew why I shrugged my shoulders, blinked my eyes many times in a row over and over, swallowed, jutted my arms out to the sides, grinded my teeth, bit my fingernails so far down until they bled, bit the insides of my cheeks until they bled, cleared my throat, grunted, stuttered, scrunched up my face, coughed forcefully, etc. Tourettes was the reason. I didn’t want to do these things, but my mind made me.
I had never been very good at studying before, but I had always been able to when I really put my mind to it. During junior year that was even impossible. The first time I sat down at my desk to do homework that year I absolutely could not do it. It started with me becoming distracted by everything in and around my desk each time I sat down to do homework. I tried doing it at different times and in different parts of the house, but nothing worked.
About a month later I also began having horrible symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. OCD first showed itself in me in the form of making me think about making lists and being obsessed with certain numbers. When it began, an idea would pop into my head. Then, I would spend the next two or three hours writing down everything I could think of that was related to that subject. If I started thinking about cars, for instance, I would get out a piece of paper and write down every make and model of every car I could think of. If I started thinking about professional basketball teams, I would jot the names of every team and players on them, until I couldn’t think of anymore. No topic was off limits. Whatever came into my mind would be written down on paper and consume my thoughts for hours.
Later on I became obsessed with numbers. I started counting up to whatever number was my new favorite each time I did a daily activity. Most people would do things, like brushing their hair, until they thought it looked good. I had to brush mine well past that. Even if my hair looked good, I had to continue on. I would get stuck on a number for months. Then, all of a sudden, I would become obsessed with another number for several months. The numbers were always odd and consisted of having the same number multiple times. The numbers 77, 111, and 333 were some of my favorites. If the number that I was stuck on was 111, for example, I would make sure I did every daily activity I did during that time, no less and no more than 111 times each time I did them. Things like brushing my teeth, brushing my hair, and running my hands through my hair while shampooing it, each had to be done exactly 111 times. It had to add up to exactly 111, or it didn’t feel right. If I ever miscounted I had to start over and count again. I knew that it wasn’t normal and that it would have sounded crazy to anyone I told, but I couldn’t help it. I didn’t know why I was doing these things, but I had to do them. My mind made me.
Halfway through that school year, after having had the horrible obsessive thoughts, where I made lists and obsessed over numbers, another variance of OCD appeared. Up until then I had either made lists or obsessed over numbers. I had done one or the other and had never done both of them at the same time. During the middle of the school year both of them combined to make to make my life a living hell. I would begin by getting a thought in my head, just like I had done before. I would then start making a list and I would not stop thinking about that topic until I had written down as many items as the number that I was obsessed with at the time. It was easy to think of more than the number I was obsessed with, especially when that number was low. When the number I was obsessed with was a high number and a topic that I did not know much about entered my brain, I was in deep trouble. Many times, when that happened, I would be up until the early morning hours, trying to think of enough things to write down on my paper. If I thought of them I would go to bed. If I couldn’t think of them I would stay up until I did, sometimes all night. If I just tried to forget about my list and go to sleep, thoughts about the list would overwhelm me. At that point I would have to get up out of bed and work on the list until I was finished or until it was time to go to school. There were many times, after staying up all night, where my brain would be so exhausted that it would just shut off. That was the only time I ever got a decent amount of sleep for three years straight. I would usually forget about making the lists while I was at school or when I was doing things that I enjoyed. I pretty much only made lists when I was bored, alone, or doing something I didn’t enjoy. I made lists and obsessed over numbers in the same way, every time I was in any of those three situations, every day for three years. I was constantly having obsessive thoughts, or thinking about having obsessive thoughts.
I am now taking medication for both disorders. I will probably be on medication for life. The medication gets rid of the tics, but it also has many side effects. I am constantly tired and groggy and I can’t think straight. The best way to describe being on this medication is that it is like having a bad hangover. I have had that hangover every second of every day for the past twenty-three years. When I tell people what it was like before I started taking medication and what my life is like now almost everyone tells me that it sounds like being on medication is worse than not being on it. Those people cannot possibly comprehend what it was like have thoughts and feelings of doing things I didn’t want to do and thinking about things I didn’t want to think about every waking second of every day. Unless those people have lived as I have lived and walked in my shoes there is no way they can come close to understanding what I have been through and what I go through every day.
Even though I have had a very hard life I still have hope. I have a lot of hobbies. I have taken singing lessons with a few different instructors and they have each told me that I show promise. I have also come up with a number of inventions, that I know have never been thought of before. I have been told promising things about many of them too. I have also written the lyrics to a number of songs, which have been recorded by a professional, although, not well-known, musician. I have also been told that I am good at writing stories and poetry.
Even if none of my hobbies ever make any money or if I never have a great job, I will be okay with the way my life has turned out. I have been a swim coach and swim instructor for over twenty years. That means that I have taught over two thousand children how to swim or swim better. I have been a volunteer soccer coach for twelve years, which means that I have taught over two hundred children how to play soccer or play it better. I may be being naïve, but that’s well over two thousand kids whose lives I have had a chance to influence, and teach things that they will always remember. I don’t care what anyone else thinks except me and I think that is priceless.



About Chris Mason


My name is Chris Mason. I live in San Francisco, CA. I have Tourette syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. This is a new edition of my first book. My first book (Touretties) was published in 2011. It is an anthology that includes twenty-one true short stories, including my own, about people who have or have a family member who has Tourette syndrome and its associated disorders. My autobiograpy (What Makes Me Tic: Living With Tourette Syndrome) was published as an ebook in 2013. I have also written a children’s picture book that includes four stories, written in the authors’ own words, about what is like having Tourette syndrome as a child, which will be published later this year. I have also written a full-length non-fiction book about my experiences coaching youth soccer, which will also be published later this year. I am currently working on two other children’s picture books and my first work of fiction, which I am hoping to have published next year.